NSFW: “Skins” Is A Controversial Comedy With A Big Heart

 

 
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Title: Skins
 
Director:
 
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Genre: ,
 
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Direction
9.0


 
Acting
8.0


 
Plot
8.0


 
Execution
8.0


 
Total Score
8.3


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Posted April 18, 2017 by

 
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A man sits in an all pink room, speaking to a nurse on a pink telephone. Tears stream down his face as he’s inquiring about his wife and if she’s given birth to their son yet. As he hangs up the phone, he knows he will never see his child. This man is Simon (Antonio Durán ‘Morris’) and the naked woman sitting across from his is Claudia (Carmen Machi): a madam that offers people a private evening with young kids who suffer from deformities. The young girl that Simon is about to spend time with is Laura; she was born without eyes. Simon has brought her two large pink diamonds that stick to her skin, saying she deserves the most beautiful eyes in the world. She will wear them into adulthood until another customer comes to visit and decides to take them. Welcome to Eduardo Cassanova’s weird world of “Skins”: a Spanish comedy/drama that will challenge you visually but underneath the graphic surface lies a movie about love and acceptance, and the way we all long for both.

Eduardo Cassanova’s “Skins” jumps from character to character, all with some kind of deformity (whether that be physically or mentally), and while they all seem only connected by the oddness of their situation their lives begin to intertwine and effect one another in unexpected ways. You have Samantha (Ana Polvorosa): a young woman whose mouth is were her asshole should be and her asshole is where her mouth should go. Then there’s Cristian (Eloi Costa): a guy who suffers from Body Integrity Identity Disorder and thinks more people would love him if he could just get rid of his damn legs. Ernesto (Secun de la Rosa) is a grown man who still lives at home and loves a woman who has a sloping and deformed half of a face, Ana (Candela Peña). He eventually gets kicked out of his mother’s house and is dead set on making his relationship work out. We also get to know an obese waitress that visits Laura, who’s now an adult, because she can’t see and can’t judge. It’s the only physical relationship the waitress has been a part of. And last but not least we have Vanesa (Ana María Ayala): a little person who works on a kid’s television show but has lost the enjoyment and is in danger of losing her income. 

While it may be hard for some people to watch, “Skins” is actually a beautiful film: emotionally and in the way in which it is shot. Eduardo Cassanova has a clearly distinct vision; like a contemporary John Waters. Many of the scenes are color coordinated, everything has almost a glossed-over aesthetic to it, and despite the characters being less than appealing to look at, everything else is perfect in appearance; there for a specific reason.

The moral of the story is that no matter how different we may look, or how perfect in some people’s cases, we all have the same basic human emotions. We all long to be loved and appreciated and happy. It’s just for the characters in this film, getting over that visual or mental obstacle is a tough one and makes even going outside the most difficult of tasks. This is one of those films that you just pray someone doesn’t walk in in the middle of you viewing it. It’s not one that’s easily explained. If you’re not watching from the beginning, you will not stay until the end. “Skins” is Eduardo Cassanova’s first feature-length film and it’s proof that he is a director with a distinct vision and creative way of telling a story.

“Skins” is now streaming on Netflix and is definitely one of the most original films you’ll see this year.


DavidRyanM

 


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